Saturday, October 7, 2017

10th Annual Worldwide Photowalk



This was the 10th anniversary of the Worldwide Photowalk. By bride Christi singed up once again to lead one of the many around the world, here in Porter, Indiana. 


This Worldwide Photowalk event is held the 1st Saturday of each year, so mark you calendars now for next years walk which Christi is planning at Potato Creek State Park in North Liberty, Indiana. The event is held to support The Springs Of Hope Kenya Orphanage organization. Asking donation is $1. Again, this is a donation. Spend as little or as much as you would like, or even nothing is you so choose.

Here is Christi wrote for this years photowalk location (click "here" for Christi's blog): 

"I invite you to join me for a relaxing photo walk through nature and history… Any and all skill levels are welcomed, and what you use to shoot with is up to you, if you’re comfortable shooting with a cell phone, have at it!

This is one of my favorite places to enjoy nature, and it’s rich in Indiana history. I can spend hours here, and will probably stay after the walk, or return if anyone wants to do lunch and share favorite spots and photos.

About the location…

In 1822, fur trade pioneer Joseph Bailly established a trading post on the southern shore of Lake Michigan. He acquired the homestead and surrounding lands in the 1830s. Bailly Homestead was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1962 and is preserved by the National Park Service.

The original house has been restored to its 1917 appearance and, during the summer, is open for scheduled tours. Other buildings on the property include a two-story log cabin which served as a summer kitchen prior to being used as a chapel, a brick house that was built in 1874 by Bailly’s daughter, Rose Howe, and a storehouse. The Bailly Cemetery is located about a half mile north of the homestead.

Chellberg Farm was established by Swedish immigrants, Anders and Johanna “Kjellberg,” who purchased 80 acres in Porter County in the 1870s to establish a modest family farm. Three generations of the Chellberg family lived there and in the 1930s, started to tap the property’s maple trees to produce syrup.

Along with the historical buildings and cemetery (if anyone is interested, and time allows it) we can hike part of the diverse Little Calumet Trail. It would include hiking through a forest dominated by maple, beech, basswood, and oak trees. We’d follow a stretch of the Little Calumet River, once a critical transportation route for early regional travelers, and explore the recently restored Mnok√© Prairie for a glimmer of the vast stretches of pre-settlement grasslands.

Trail Length – 3.7 miles
(Bailly/Chellberg loop: 2.1 miles; Little Calumet loop: 1.6 miles).
Average Hike Time – 45 minutes to 2 hours.
Trail Surface – Packed soil and wood chips; stairs.
Difficulty – Easy to moderate; mostly flat, but with some steep grades and stairs."

The photographs below will show you some of this walk. I hope you can make the take to go visit yourself. It is a wonderful experience!














































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Wednesday, October 4, 2017

Origami in the Garden - The Morton Arboretum



Happy anniversary Christi!!!  Love you always . . .

Seems like this week if you were planning travel you needed to travel to where the good weather was. My bride Christi and I had originally wanted to go to Indianapolis to the zoo to photograph for our wedding anniversary, however, the weather was not cooperating. So we chose differently at the last minute and went to The Morton Arboretum. There we found the "Origami in the Garden" event, which goes through Sunday, October 22nd if you are interested. You can find out more by clicking "here". These origami sculptures are made of steel, from various artists.

It was definitely a beautiful and enjoyable day at The Morton Arboretum.  We are very happy to be members.  There is a lot to see and to take in.  Trees, flowers, hummingbirds flying around, and of course all of the events they hold throughout the year.  If you have not been to The Morton Arboretum yet, I suggest you go at least once.  I am sure it will turn into more than once. I have more information on their location etc. at the bottom of this blog post. 

Here are some photographs we took. The first is of their sprinkler system connection. Why? It just interested me. Oh, and you may notice it is pumpkin season too . . .




















My bride Christi . . .










In case you were wondering what fill flash can do, take a look at the difference between the next two photographs.















I never did take a good photograph of these two buffalo. The Morton Arboretum's website has a real good photograph for you to look at.



















This display was really cool. The black gloss tile at the bottom simulated water, giving the feel of bird migration.





Also at The Morton Arboretum was this years "Scarecrow Trail", created by local scout troops. These scarecrows were very good. You also were able to vote for the best one. There were three at the top of my list that I had to choose one from. Which one? I am not going to influence you. Go see the exhibit and vote!  Exhibit runs until the end of October. (I did not photograph every one of them. There a lot of entries to look at.)





















These next two origami sculptures were made independently. I believe without each others knowledge. It was not until they arrived at The Morton Arboretum that they became a joint show / story.










Afterward we drove to Superdawg drive-in on N Milwaukee Ave to check it out. One of those iconic things you need to do or see (or eat) once in your life.










The Morton Arboretum
4100 IL-53
Lisle, IL  60532
630.968.0074


Superdawg
(two locations, Chicago and Wheeling)


(I have not shown Wikipedia links before. This time I thought you would find the information interesting.)

At the bottom of this blog post are five buttons to click on: E-mail this, Blog this, Share to Twitter, Share to Facebook, and Share to Pintrest.  Please take advantage of them and share this blog post with your friends.

You can see a categorized thumbnail filmstrip of blogs I have done by going to StreetPhoto.ME.

Click on this line and read my copyright.